Saturday, February 8, 2014

Lindsay Lohan, Dr. Khaushal Sharma, and yet another big fat(obese?)WTF

I found this on the internet, and it's sort of insane. Sort of - only due to some insane truths to be found therein. What is going here? Is this for real, and then someone edited it to make Lohan look crazy and rotten? If so, why? Who would go to this much trouble? What ever did happen to Dr. Kaushal's appointment in Lohan's case? Why is Dr. Sharma even allowed in a court when he is a sociopathic criminal, who has made his fortune off the misfortune of so many. I sued this bastard, and the judge dismissed on an immunity that didn't apply in his case. That's how it goes in Los Angeles legal land. Many are on death row on this man's "reports." Many intelligent and sane individuals are locked up in Patton due to this monster's ambitions.


 In the age of this internet business, might as well give it a tiny bit more visibility, and maybe someone out there in the YONDER will explain this new bit of insanity. Or, maybe someone in the yonder will get some insight or assistance.... Who knows. Not I.

All I have to say for now is that Dr. Kaushal Sharma is a profoundly evil man, who fixes cases in the Los Angeles Superior Court, with chilling impunity. And, that is the opposite of hyperbole. OMG!

He is out of my real nightmare, and I will never be at peace, knowing that he is free to try( or succeed) in destroying anyone that he is told to destroy by Kroll( and by proxy Judge Samantha Jessner and Judge Maria Stratton, and let's not forget Karla Kerlin and Judge Robert Vanderet et al etc S.OS.)

. Oh my this all does sound unhinged and crazy, and years ago I'd think so too. I wouldn't give myself the time of day, I'm sure.

 But, as it stands, my hinges are rusty, but they still are hinged,  and I really can't care much about appearances-- as I try to secure some justice and truth for myself and anyone who might be similarly affected.


 I am writing it all up, and experiencing great delays due to being overcome with this level of sinister, and so hear and there I just post something to save society from certain true blue psychopaths.

Ok, here's the document already!

100710 Emergency Motion Requesting

listserv.alachua.fl.us/.../wa.exe?...
Emergency Motion to Remove Dr. Kaushal Sharma and Assign Dr. ... Comes now, Appellant, Lindsay Lohan, hereinafter referred to as “Appellant” or ... to State Attorneys Office by the Appeals Department (at their discretion) upon their receipt ...



IN THE LOS ANGELES SUPERIOR COURT

                                                                                    Lower Tribunal’s Case No.:
LINDSAY LOHAN                                                  Division: 
                        Appellant/Petitioner,                          
                                                                                   
and,                                                                
                                                                        Emergency Motion to Remove Dr. Kaushal Sharma and Assign Dr. Tietlebaum of the University of Florida to Care and Counsel Appellant and Motion Compelling Full Disclosure of Dr. Tietlebaum’s Finances, Political Affiliations and Financial Relationships with Any Pharmaceutical Provider so as to Ensure the Integrity of this Process and the Safety of Ms. Lohan
STATE ATTORNEY’S OFFICE
                        Appellee/Respondent

Comes now, Appellant, Lindsay Lohan, hereinafter referred to as “Appellant” or “Petitioner,” and files this Emergency Motion to Remove Dr. Kaushal Sharma and Assign Dr. Tietlebaum of the University of Florida to Care and Counsel Appellant and Motion Compelling Full Disclosure of Dr. Tietlebaum’s Finances, Political Affiliations and Financial Relationships with Any Pharmaceutical Provider so as to Ensure the Integrity of this Process and the Safety of Ms. Lohan and states as follows:
1.      Court submits as proof of the forced sterilization procedures and their relations to psychotropic drugs an exhaustive study conducted by Harry Bruinius, The Secret of Forced Sterilization in the United States and its .  Please see www.brown-bear.com regarding the attention needed to address the current and overturned sanction of forced sterilization in America. 
2.      Appellant, Lindsay Lohan, would like Dr. Tietlebaum assigned to conduct her evaluations and submits information regarding this physician, attached hereto as Exhibit “A.”
3.      Dr. Kaushal Sharma obviously causes Lindsay Lohan emotional duress as clearly exhibited during Judge Revel’s reciting her Orders and Ms. Lohan’s severe emotional reaction and pain as exhibited on her face at the mention of Dr. Kaushal Sharma’s name.
            It is Appellant’s position the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department should investigate the individuals regarding their association in a Ponzi Scheme with pharmaceutical providers, psychiatrists, prisons, clothing designers and manufacturers that use the art of semiotics and masonry and media, providing psychotropic pills when a woman or man has questions that he or she cannot answer and commits the simple act of seeking a bottle to simulate a mother’s love, as violence against towards a very bullied (see twitter post indicating unprovoked battery at restaurant) and a very wholly American woman in California trying to understand herself.  It is the position of the Appellant’s attorney such investigations should be done out of the public eye and that all attorneys and media tyrants and tycoons and attorneys (such as Mr. Copeland) should be watched assiduously by the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department so as not to endanger the transition in this game of semiotics, masonry, media and shame that Los Angeles in using to find itself in a melting pot of California.  In order to ensure Lindsay Lohan’s safety a copy of this brief has also been submitted to FBI Chief Gillies and the Los Angeles Police Department, as well as Attorney Copeland who has stated that Lindsay Lohan “has no chance” of winning and has provided his information and direct e-mail address on the website so that he is clear as to how endangered Lindsay Lohan’s life would be if he uses a white penniless woman to advance his career and protect any affiliations he may have to political, professional and legal structures that will suffer if Lindsay’s case advances the cause of public transportation and his drunk driving criminal defense business, all of a sudden, goes broke.  Appellant’s attorney notes that Mr. Copeland is black and that the paralegal offering her legal research skills and first drafts and ideas to attorneys for their professional review is a public transportation development activist that has very different political views from Mr. and Mrs. Obama and their FORCED treatment of people and their FORCED choosing of medical providers via the federal government.  Appellant’s attorney requests investigation into any Ponzi Scheme Mr. and Mrs. Obama may be involved in as Mrs. Obama is only an attorney and yet was involved in the administration of a hospital in Chicago and Mr. Obama was a self-professed “co-caine” junky.  Masonry, words, ideas, science and politics seem to have merged in this case and Appellant’s attorney requests FBI protection for Ms. Lohan and REMOVAL of her ankle bracelet.

CERTIFICATE OF SERVICE
            I hereby certify a true and correct copy will be sent via HAND-DELIVERY to State Attorneys Office by the Appeals Department (at their discretion) upon their receipt of this Notice to Invoke Discretionary Jurisdiction of the California and the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday, July 12, 2010. 
           
                                                                                                ____________________________
                                                                              Attorney for Lindsay Lohan












EXHIBIT A
Substance abuse growing among boomers
Growing number of older Americans have substance abuse problems, including many 'high-end professionals'
http://www.gainesville.com/apps/pbcsi.dll/bilde?Site=GS&Date=20100619&Category=ARTICLES&ArtNo=6191011&Ref=AR&Profile=1118&MaxW=600&border=0
Doug Finger/Staff photographer
Scott Teitlebaum, an award-winning addictions counselor, poses in his office Friday, June 18, 2010.

By Diane Chun
Staff writer
Published: Saturday, June 19, 2010 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Friday, June 18, 2010 at 10:52 p.m.
When you say the word "addict," you might not automatically picture a member of the baby boomer generation. But statistics show that 4 million Americans nearing retirement age have a substance abuse problem - be it illegal drugs, prescription drugs or alcohol.

And, area experts say, more often than not these addicts are "high-end professionals" with the disposable income to fuel their habits.
Today, there are about 75 million Americans who were born between 1946 and 1964, about 29 percent of the U.S. population. Experts say this generation of boomers on the doorstep of old age will put a tremendous strain on the health-care system and social services as they deal with the illness that is addiction.
According to a newly released report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, or SAMHSA, the proportion of older people treated for a combination of cocaine and alcohol abuse tripled between 1992 and 2008.
An increasing proportion of people over the age of 50 admitted to the hospital for substance abuse treatment had begun using the substances within the past five years, according to the report.
For this group, in 2008, cocaine abuse was the leading cause of admission involving drugs, at 26.2 percent, but abuse of prescription drugs came in a close second at 25.8 percent.
Officials at the Hanley Center, a nationally known, nonprofit residential treatment center in West Palm Beach, say baby boomers arrive at the center taking an average of 4.5 prescription drugs and 3.5 over-the-counter medications.
The nonprofit addiction treatment center recently launched a Freedom Program for Boomers, the first such program in the country to address the specific needs of this generation.
"Boomers are at a critical stage in life when stress mounts from age-related health issues, blended families, grief and loss, financial strain and caring for both aging parents and children," said John Dyben, Hanley's clinical director. "It seems to hit them all at once, and can open the door to alcohol addiction, drug abuse or both."
Many baby boomers are taking medications prescribed for anxiety. Because of the highly addictive nature of some of these drugs, they can become chemically dependent, Dyben explained.
"In many cases, chronic pain has become inseparable from addiction," Dyben said. "It also complicates the recovery process."
Dyben, a certified addiction counselor, characterizes the mind-set of the boomer generation: "They are not prepared to simply accept aging, or the physical pain, the trouble sleeping and other problems that come along with it. There is prescription medication for whatever ails you. It's real effective. And much of it is highly addictive."
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report the most common poisonings treated in emergency departments in the United States are caused by misuse of opioid pain medications.
It is estimated that at least 980,000 people in the United States are currently addicted to some type of opiate.
So it's no surprise that a recent SAMHSA study found a 111 percent increase in emergency room visits involving non-medical use of prescription opioid pain relievers. Oxycodone, or the brand name OxyContin, is an example of these pain killers.
"We urgently need to take action," says Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control. "Emergency department visits involving non-medical use of these prescription drugs are now as common as emergency department visits for use of illicit drugs. These prescription medicines help many people, but we need to be sure they are used properly and safely."

Doug Finger/Staff photographer
Scott Teitlebaum, an award-winning addictions counselor, poses in his office Friday, June 18, 2010.

By Diane Chun
Staff writer
Published: Saturday, June 19, 2010 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Friday, June 18, 2010 at 10:52 p.m.
When you say the word "addict," you might not automatically picture a member of the baby boomer generation. But statistics show that 4 million Americans nearing retirement age have a substance abuse problem - be it illegal drugs, prescription drugs or alcohol.

And, area experts say, more often than not these addicts are "high-end professionals" with the disposable income to fuel their habits.
Today, there are about 75 million Americans who were born between 1946 and 1964, about 29 percent of the U.S. population. Experts say this generation of boomers on the doorstep of old age will put a tremendous strain on the health-care system and social services as they deal with the illness that is addiction.
According to a newly released report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, or SAMHSA, the proportion of older people treated for a combination of cocaine and alcohol abuse tripled between 1992 and 2008.
An increasing proportion of people over the age of 50 admitted to the hospital for substance abuse treatment had begun using the substances within the past five years, according to the report.
For this group, in 2008, cocaine abuse was the leading cause of admission involving drugs, at 26.2 percent, but abuse of prescription drugs came in a close second at 25.8 percent.
Officials at the Hanley Center, a nationally known, nonprofit residential treatment center in West Palm Beach, say baby boomers arrive at the center taking an average of 4.5 prescription drugs and 3.5 over-the-counter medications.
The nonprofit addiction treatment center recently launched a Freedom Program for Boomers, the first such program in the country to address the specific needs of this generation.
"Boomers are at a critical stage in life when stress mounts from age-related health issues, blended families, grief and loss, financial strain and caring for both aging parents and children," said John Dyben, Hanley's clinical director. "It seems to hit them all at once, and can open the door to alcohol addiction, drug abuse or both."
Many baby boomers are taking medications prescribed for anxiety. Because of the highly addictive nature of some of these drugs, they can become chemically dependent, Dyben explained.
"In many cases, chronic pain has become inseparable from addiction," Dyben said. "It also complicates the recovery process."
Dyben, a certified addiction counselor, characterizes the mind-set of the boomer generation: "They are not prepared to simply accept aging, or the physical pain, the trouble sleeping and other problems that come along with it. There is prescription medication for whatever ails you. It's real effective. And much of it is highly addictive."
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report the most common poisonings treated in emergency departments in the United States are caused by misuse of opioid pain medications.
It is estimated that at least 980,000 people in the United States are currently addicted to some type of opiate.
So it's no surprise that a recent SAMHSA study found a 111 percent increase in emergency room visits involving non-medical use of prescription opioid pain relievers. Oxycodone, or the brand name OxyContin, is an example of these pain killers.
"We urgently need to take action," says Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control. "Emergency department visits involving non-medical use of these prescription drugs are now as common as emergency department visits for use of illicit drugs. These prescription medicines help many people, but we need to be sure they are used properly and safely."
"Our generation had a liberal attitude toward experimentation with drugs that persists today," said 53-year-old Dr. Scott Teitelbaum of the Florida Recovery Center. "Alcohol will always be an issue. But the prescription drug epidemic is the wave we are facing now.
"There is a naive attitude among health-care professionals about the risks of exposure to drugs prescribed for physical or psychic pain," he added.
As division chief for addiction medicine at the University of Florida, Teitelbaum trains medical students, residents and fellows in the nature of addictive disease.
In the boomer generation, recognizing an addict isn't so easy. Teitelbaum said that roughly half the patients he sees at the Florida Recovery Center are well educated, "high-end professionals" who are very successful in life.
They have a significant disposable income, Dyben added, and often an ambivalence toward illicit drug use that dates back to their youth in the 1960s or '70s. He mentions the motto "Better living through chemistry."
"So you have a high demand for a quick fix, and the disposable income to drive it. It is the perfect storm," Dyben said.
Many boomers who become chemically dependent on prescription painkillers or anxiety medications such as Xanax also are going back to their original drugs of choice, Dyben said. About 5 percent have used an illicit drug in the past year, most commonly marijuana.
"That was seen as a hippie's drug, but the reality now is it's your CEO's drug. And they are mixing prescription meds with pot or alcohol, which speeds up the time it takes for a person to become chemically dependent or addicted," he said.
Both Dyban and Teitelbaum emphasize that boomer drug use affects the whole community. Addiction has severe medical consequences, affecting body, mind and spirit.
"We are already seeing the boomers becoming a giant weight on our medical system," Dyban said. "You will see increased overdoses, psychiatric complications, and hospitalizations."Doug Finger/Staff photographer Buy photo
Scott Teitlebaum, an award-winning addictions counselor, poses in his office Friday, June 18, 2010.

By Diane Chun
Staff writer
Published: Saturday, June 19, 2010 at 6:01 a.m.
Last Modified: Friday, June 18, 2010 at 10:52 p.m.
( page 4 of 4 )
When you say the word "addict," you might not automatically picture a member of the baby boomer generation. But statistics show that 4 million Americans nearing retirement age have a substance abuse problem - be it illegal drugs, prescription drugs or alcohol.
And, area experts say, more often than not these addicts are "high-end professionals" with the disposable income to fuel their habits.
Today, there are about 75 million Americans who were born between 1946 and 1964, about 29 percent of the U.S. population. Experts say this generation of boomers on the doorstep of old age will put a tremendous strain on the health-care system and social services as they deal with the illness that is addiction.
According to a newly released report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, or SAMHSA, the proportion of older people treated for a combination of cocaine and alcohol abuse tripled between 1992 and 2008.
An increasing proportion of people over the age of 50 admitted to the hospital for substance abuse treatment had begun using the substances within the past five years, according to the report.
For this group, in 2008, cocaine abuse was the leading cause of admission involving drugs, at 26.2 percent, but abuse of prescription drugs came in a close second at 25.8 percent.
Officials at the Hanley Center, a nationally known, nonprofit residential treatment center in West Palm Beach, say baby boomers arrive at the center taking an average of 4.5 prescription drugs and 3.5 over-the-counter medications.
The nonprofit addiction treatment center recently launched a Freedom Program for Boomers, the first such program in the country to address the specific needs of this generation.
"Boomers are at a critical stage in life when stress mounts from age-related health issues, blended families, grief and loss, financial strain and caring for both aging parents and children," said John Dyben, Hanley's clinical director. "It seems to hit them all at once, and can open the door to alcohol addiction, drug abuse or both."
Many baby boomers are taking medications prescribed for anxiety. Because of the highly addictive nature of some of these drugs, they can become chemically dependent, Dyben explained.
"In many cases, chronic pain has become inseparable from addiction," Dyben said. "It also complicates the recovery process."
Dyben, a certified addiction counselor, characterizes the mind-set of the boomer generation: "They are not prepared to simply accept aging, or the physical pain, the trouble sleeping and other problems that come along with it. There is prescription medication for whatever ails you. It's real effective. And much of it is highly addictive."
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report the most common poisonings treated in emergency departments in the United States are caused by misuse of opioid pain medications.
It is estimated that at least 980,000 people in the United States are currently addicted to some type of opiate.
So it's no surprise that a recent SAMHSA study found a 111 percent increase in emergency room visits involving non-medical use of prescription opioid pain relievers. Oxycodone, or the brand name OxyContin, is an example of these pain killers.
"We urgently need to take action," says Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control. "Emergency department visits involving non-medical use of these prescription drugs are now as common as emergency department visits for use of illicit drugs. These prescription medicines help many people, but we need to be sure they are used properly and safely."
"Our generation had a liberal attitude toward experimentation with drugs that persists today," said 53-year-old Dr. Scott Teitelbaum of the Florida Recovery Center. "Alcohol will always be an issue. But the prescription drug epidemic is the wave we are facing now.
"There is a naive attitude among health-care professionals about the risks of exposure to drugs prescribed for physical or psychic pain," he added.
As division chief for addiction medicine at the University of Florida, Teitelbaum trains medical students, residents and fellows in the nature of addictive disease.
In the boomer generation, recognizing an addict isn't so easy. Teitelbaum said that roughly half the patients he sees at the Florida Recovery Center are well educated, "high-end professionals" who are very successful in life.
They have a significant disposable income, Dyben added, and often an ambivalence toward illicit drug use that dates back to their youth in the 1960s or '70s. He mentions the motto "Better living through chemistry."
"So you have a high demand for a quick fix, and the disposable income to drive it. It is the perfect storm," Dyben said.
Many boomers who become chemically dependent on prescription painkillers or anxiety medications such as Xanax also are going back to their original drugs of choice, Dyben said. About 5 percent have used an illicit drug in the past year, most commonly marijuana.
"That was seen as a hippie's drug, but the reality now is it's your CEO's drug. And they are mixing prescription meds with pot or alcohol, which speeds up the time it takes for a person to become chemically dependent or addicted," he said.
Both Dyban and Teitelbaum emphasize that boomer drug use affects the whole community. Addiction has severe medical consequences, affecting body, mind and spirit.
"We are already seeing the boomers becoming a giant weight on our medical system," Dyban said. "You will see increased overdoses, psychiatric complications, and hospitalizations."
Teitelbaum, who spent a decade in private practice as a pediatrician before dealing with his own substance abuse, knows first-hand the personal cost of addiction.
"It was my own addiction and recovery that led me to addiction medicine," Teitelbaum said. "Addiction took everything I valued from me. Because I've walked the path, I see the tragedy of addiction as well as the beauty of recovery."
Dyban wants to send a message to families of the addicted: The first step is to get help for yourselves. Don't try to deal with it alone.
There are resources out there, he emphasized, for those willing to do the research and find them: Al-Anon, therapists, intervention programs, an academic center like the Florida Recovery Center.
"Life is painful," Teitelbaum added. "But that is part of what makes us what we are. We have to learn to cope with the discomfort without medicating it away."









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